We’ve taught you the intricacies of keeping your crew happy and healthy on set (refer to *this Dash*). Now, it’s time to talk a bit about the differences between shooting in the winter versus summer, and how to continue to keep that positivity flowing with your crew, client, and even equipment.

The Basics

Of course, there are the obvious differences, like a dramatic change in temperature or the amount of sunlight in a day. But how do you handle, say, keeping your equipment safe from condensation damage when it’s six degrees outside? Or keeping your crew hydrated in mid-July heat?

We’re going to walk you through some things to consider when scheduling a shoot, and how to decide whether a summer or winter production is better.

Winter Shoots

As stated above, keeping your equipment safe is a big concern during wintertime. Any type of drastic change in temperature (such as going from an outdoor location to an indoor location) can result in condensation forming on your camera and lenses, damaging them. The best way to avoid this is to acclimate to these different temperatures slowly. This can be as simple as making sure all gear is secured tightly in the proper camera bags. It’s also important to remember not to wipe the lens if you do notice condensation, which could result in smears or scratches.

Shooting interiors in the winter will result in a much more controlled environment. Temperatures will be regulated, the video can be evergreen, equipment will be consistently safe, and you won’t have to worry about seeing your actor’s breath. But sometimes that’s not the vision of the project.

If you are shooting outside in the winter, make sure you have enough hand and feet warmers for your crew. It’s imperative to prep for snow, rain, and ice. Have a backup plan that includes rain dates or other locations. Although the sun sets significantly earlier in the winter than the summer, golden hour is unbeatable during this time of year. Since the sun sits lower in the sky throughout these months, it allows for a softer light for your shot.

Summer Shoots

Keeping your crew hydrated to avoid heat stroke is incredibly important during summer. Water and gatorade should be consistently available on set, as should an air conditioned or shaded place to go to during breaks.

Summertime means more light, which means longer days. This is great, as it allows you to get more footage for your video! But, if you’re waiting for magic hour, you’ll have to wait longer.

Another aspect to consider during summer is visible sweat on actors. There needs to be a place where they feel physically comfortable and relaxed, as well as extra outfit options and a makeup artist available for any touch ups.

At the end of the day, consider what you want your subjects to wear and if this video will be used year round. Make sure talent has a place where they feel comfortable, and your crew takes necessary water or heating breaks. Remember that both air conditioning and heaters can be loud, so consider that for audio purposes.

Takeaways 

It’s important to take these things into account when planning a production, but equally important to remember that the production company and crew is trained to be flexible and prepared for the unexpected. Keep an eye on weather, have water on set, keep hand warmers close by, and enjoy the shoot! Most importantly, trust that the experts can make movie magic during any season!

Have any questions? Are you ready to dive into your next production project? Contact us at https://koi-fly.com/contact/

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